U.S. racing playing catch-up when it comes to concussions

Ramon Dominguez and Haynesfield after winning the Whirlaway in 2009. NYRA/Adam Coglianese

Ramon Dominguez and Haynesfield after winning the Whirlaway in 2009. NYRA/Adam Coglianese

The International Conference for the Health, Safety, and Welfare of Jockeys held at Monmouth Park last September lived up to its name, and featured presentations about racing in England, Ireland, France, Hong Kong, Australia, Japan, Germany, Uruguay, and the United States.

The program highlighted one of the major differences between the U.S. and many international racing jurisdictions: The lack of a single governing body to oversee the sport in America, and the way it can hinder progress on a variety of issues, including those of jockey health and safety.

The U.S. lags at least a decade behind Great Britain in its approach to concussions suffered by riders. Since 2004, all jockeys riding on British Horse Racing Authority (BHA) tracks are required to undergo baseline neuropsychological testing annually in order to be licensed. In addition, a standard protocol must be followed before a concussed jockey is permitted to begin riding, a protocol that is overseen by the BHA.

Continue reading at Thoroughbred Racing Commentary.

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s